Vol - 25, Issue - 5
About the Journal
[This article belongs to Volume - 25, Issue - 5]
International Medical Journal
Journal ID : IMJ-09-05-2020-455
Total View : 336

Abstract : Various inpatient studies in Malaysia have reported Klebsiella pneumonia, as the most frequently identified pathogen among patients presenting with lower respiratory infections (LRTI). This finding differs from numerous Western and Asian studies that have reported Streptococcus pneumonia as the most frequently identified pathogen for LRTI. As the microbial pattern of sputum cultures among local outpatients in Malaysia is unknown, this study aimed to examine the most frequently isolated pathogen among this group of patients. A retrospective descriptive study looking at sputum samples sent from adult patients of an academic primary care clinic for a period of one year. 511 sputum samples were received. 22.1% of sputum were positive for an isolate. 77.1% of the cultures did not yield a growth.0.8% of sputum was deemed unsuitable for culture. The most common isolated organism was Klebsiella pneumonia followed by Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa and Haemophilus influenza.Among the Klebsiella isolates, it was 100% sensitive to the cephalosporins and amoxicillin clavulanic acid but was resistant to ampicillin.Although the majority of the sputum cultures did not have a yield,60% of patients were prescribed antibiotics. The overall positive sputum yield from this study was low, 22.1%. The surprising finding in this study is that the most frequently isolated organism was Klebsiella pneumonia, which differs from Western studies but is similar to local inpatient studies.There was high usage of antibiotics in this primary care clinic. However, when an antibiotic was used, the choice of amoxicillin clavulanic acid was appropriate as Klebsiella pneumonia is sensitive to it

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