Vol - 28, Issue - 09
About the Journal
[This article belongs to Volume - 28, Issue - 09]
International Medical Journal
Journal ID : IMJ-09-10-2021-992
Total View : 371

Abstract : Chronic inguinal neuralgia is one of the most significant complication following inguinal hernia repair with a reported incidence from 29% to 76%. Routine ilioinguinal neurectomy has been proposed as a way to avoid neuralgia in post-operative period. We conducted a randomised controlled study to find out short to midterm neurosensory effects of elective ilioinguinal neurectomy during open hernia surgery. 60 patients between the age of 18 to 80 years with inguinal hernia undergoing surgery from May 2018 to February 2020 were randomised either for ilioinguinal neurectomy or ilioinguinal nerve preservation during inguinal hernia surgeries. All Surgeries were performed under spinal anaesthesia. The primary outcome was incidence of chronic pain in groin at the end of 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. The Secondary outcome was included as incidence of post-operative sensory loss or change of sensations at groin and quality of life as assessed by a questionnaire. The incidence of chronic groin pain at 6 months was significantly lower in neurectomy group than in nerve preservation group. No significant difference was found regarding the groin numbness, post-operative sensory change in areas supplied by ilioinguinal nerve and health related quality of life, all of them measured at 6 months following the procedure. Elective ilioinguinal neurectomy decreases incidence of chronic groin pain after open inguinal hernia surgery without significantly added morbidity. It should be considered as routine practice during open hernia surgery.

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