Vol - 25, Issue - 12
About the Journal
[This article belongs to Volume - 25, Issue - 12]
International Medical Journal
Journal ID : IMJ-05-12-2020-681
Total View : 435

Abstract : Evaluating oncology nurses’ satisfaction, work environment, and burnout is essential in developing intervention programs and enhancing policies, rules, and regulations. This study was conducted using cross-sectional correlational design to explore the relationship between these factors among Jordanian oncology nurses. A convenience sampling technique was used. A sample of 200 nurses from different oncology units including surgical, medical, bone marrow transplantation, paediatric, and adult outpatient clinics participated in the current study. A total of 213 participants were included from private and governmental hospitals. Of these, 150 were male (70.4%) and 63 were female (29.6%). The majority of the participants had a bachelor’s degree (89.2%), whereas only 6.3 % had a postgraduate degree. The mean age of the participants was 26.06 years (SD =3.80). The participants had moderate Personal Accomplishment (PA) burnout (M = 31.06, SD = 3.12), followed by emotional exhaustion (EE) and the lowest mean was for depolarization (DP). In general, participants had a moderate level of burnout as demonstrated by results of EE, DP, and PA. The results indicate that nurses’ satisfaction had a strong negative relationship with overall burnout (r = -0.71, n = 213, p = 0.006). In addition, the results showed a strong negative correlation between work environment and overall burnout score (r = -0.81, n = 213, p = 0.037). Hospital managers and administrators can utilize these findings and develop strategic plans for improving the work environment to increase the satisfaction among.

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